OCZ CoreXstream 500W review
Power supplies are just... one of those things. They've dropped down in prices massively in  the last couple of years, you can't have a computer without them, they produce heat, some hot airstream, some noise - yet, you can't diminish the fact that they're one of the most important aspects of your computer. They can be modular or non-modular and everyone has a preference. But, there's only a couple of rational parameters to judge them - stability, noise, heating. Let's see how OCZ's CoreXstream 500W did in some of those areas. More...
  OCZ Vertex 4 128GB review (firmware 1.5)
For years now, Vertex name is the one people talk about when talking about fast SSDs. OCZ has been on the forefront of SSD technology since the very beginning, and - so has Vertex as a "brand". Over the years, they've developed other very popular and talked-about products - for example, in desktop segment Agility, solid and others, in enterprise segment Revodrives. Let's see how the fourth generation of Vertex did on our test.
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  OCZ ZT650W and PC Power and Cooling Silencer MKIII 400W review
It's been awhile, but we managet to get our hands on some new PSU's, namely - OCZ's ZT 650W and PC Power and Cooling Silencer MK3 400W. I've been a heavy user of OCZ's PSU's back from the very beginning (still have quite a few of their *Stream PSU's) and PCP&C's - the TurboCool 1kW is still our main power supply for testing mobos, CPU's and various other things. Are these CPU's successful heirs of those legendary PSU's? Let's check them and find out. More...
  Three-way OCZ SSD shootout
Since its introduction, SSD's have been a very hot topic. Offering vast improvements over regular hard drives in terms of performance, be it read or write performance. We also saw quite a few hybrid solutions – varying from Seagate Momentus XT to OCZ's Synapse, every product being good in its own right. But overall, if you take a look at the current state of IT market, there's just one  that's moving forward really fast – SSD's.  Today, we have some  solutions from OCZ so – let's see how did they do on our tests.
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  AC Ryan Playon!HD2 and Playon!HD2 mini review
Media players are….. complicated things. They claim they can put heaven and earth on your display (be it a TV set, LCD, plasma, whatever), but often something just doesn't work. Or they have some other annoying habit, like - you have to upgrade the firmware via USB flash drive, not via Internet. Or they just overheat, or their remote controller is … a complete opposite of the term "ergonomic". With so many of them floating around the market, it's difficult to find something that just… works. More...
  OCZ Vertex 3 240GB review
Having had the pleasure of testing both Vertex 1 and 2 and owning one myself, I was "all smiley" when I received news from OCZ that a Vertex 3 sample is on the way. It looked very promising from the beginning actually - up to 550MB/s performance and loads of other things just grabs your attention from the very first day you learn about the product. And now, after a couple of weeks of day-to-night testing, it's time to produce some words and results. So, stay tuned and let's see what Vertex 3 can do. More...
  Gigabyte Z68X-UD3H-B3 review
Thanks to our long-term partner Gigabyte, today we're able to show you what these new Intel chipsets are all about - Z68-UD3H-B3 is a very good example. From what we could gather so far, Gigabyte actually has 11 new motherboards with this chipset, so, you can consider this as a first in a series of articles and one among many products on Gigabyte's line of products. Hope to see some more of them, but while we wait, let's see this one... More...
  Sapphire Radeon HD 6950 & 6970 review
With the GTX 580, although not on a new production process, NVIDIA managed to raise the bar quite substantially over the ‘previous generation’ GTX 480. The chip architecture has been improved, the yields have been improved, and the power consumption and clocks both went in the desired direction, down and up, respectively. Today we will be reviewing the cut down version fitting into the 225W thermal envelope, as well as comparing it to the two newcomers from ATI, which are supposed to directly challenge NVIDIA’s new flagship pair. More...
  Samsung R780 review
It's been awhile – but we finally got a Samsung laptop in our hands. This time, it's a very nice-looking R780, a Core i5-based laptop with 17.3“ screen so – this thing is not small, by any means. But having in mind that we've tested quite a few laptops over the past couple of months (results to be posted very soon) – we were pretty eager to see what this red thingy can do. Let's find out. More...
  OCZ Enyo 128GB review
SSD's have been somewhat of a niche that we've been testing a lot in the past year or so. They've also become a „standard“ thought for many users looking for some additional performance from their computers, be it laptops or desktops, or even netbooks. But so far, our articles have been focused more on the „in the box“ solutions that you can use in your computer, as opposed to external solutions that you can bring on the road. So, let's „correct“ this „wrongdoing“ and take you through the world of OCZ Enyo, incredible external SSD from OCZ. More...
  AMD Radeon HD 6850 and Radeon HD 6870 review
This year we won’t see a new die production process for ATI cards, as was the case last year when they introduced the 5000 series. Instead, we will have to make do with a just a refresh of the current 40 nm production process. Originally, AMD’s plan was to produce Barts in a smaller, 32nm production process. However, TSMC just couldn’t make it viable, and for two reasons. First, as AMD has experienced last year, their 40nm production process was quite problematic, resulting in low yields. Instead of working on three fronts, fixing 40 nm, and designing both 32 and 28 processes, TSMC decided to abandon the 32 nm and move directly to 28. However, not in time for Barts, so AMD was left with only 40 nm at its disposal. That kind of sealed the design of Barts, and so we are left with more of an evolution product rather than a new design. More...
  NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 review
After being late with its DX11 lineup last year, NVIDIA finally managed to get their Fermi architecture in the form of GTX 480 out to the market in April of this year. By then, AMD has been out with their 5000 series for over 6 months and although the GTX 480 claimed the performance crown, it was big, hot, and not very price competitive at launch. More...
  NVIDIA GT440 for OEM's launched?
According to some reports we received today, NVIDIA silently launched one new card for OEM's - GT440. As a member of the 4xx series, it's DX11-compatible, but comes in vastly different memory configurations, unlike anything we've seen in awhile - 1.5GB and 3GB of - believe it or not - GDDR3 memory. Graphics clock is in the below-600MHz range (594MHz from what we heard), processor clock is sub-1.2GHz (1189MHz) and it has 144 CUDA cores, which seems like a stripped-down version of the 450 card. More...
  Gigabyte GTS 450 OC2 review
After a much criticized Fermi GF100 GPU, NVIDIA launched the GF104 in July. It was a real surprise at it was not just another cut in half GPU, but instead had some of the shortcomings of GF100 fixed. The main news is that the number of TMUs which has gone up in relative terms, to almost the same amount as the high end GTX 480. The other significant news was the introduction of a superscalar architecture, which has now passed on to the GF 106. More...
  Gigabyte GTX 460 OC SLI + PhysX review
After our review of a single GTX 460 Gigabyte supplied, we found ourselves with three identical cards. Unfortunately NVIDIA doesn’t provide support for 3-Way SLI on its mainstream cards, so we decided to do a couple of things instead - to run GTX460 in SLI and compare it to GTX480 and to use a third GTX460 card for PhysX with games that support it. And to compare all of that with some CPU-doing-PhysX combinations. You can read more on Gigabyte’s card in our previous review, so here we will focus on the configurations we used for this setup. Since NVIDIA acquired Aegia, NVIDIA’s subsequent graphics cards are able to accelerate PhysX either while functioning as a GPU, or as a dedicated PhysX card. More...
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